Category Archives: Sustainability Reporting

GRI G4 EXAM – Worth the time and effort

GRI G4 Exam

GRI G4 Exam

I have been away for a few weeks enjoying the holiday break and studying for the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) G4 Exam. I passed!


For the past two years I have been a trainer in the GRI Certified Training Program with the ISOS Group. You would expect that trainers know the guidelines well!

Is taking the exam worthwhile for others in the sustainability reporting field? Yes! Passing the exam demonstrates your knowledge of the GRI G4 Guidelines. Your employer and clients will have external validation that you are knowledgeable.

In order to be eligible to take the exam, you must complete the GRI G4 Certified Training Course. During this course, you spend two days learning about the guidelines and reporting process. After completing the requirements of the course, you will receive a certificate of attendance.

How much did you retain? When you pass the exam, you demonstrate that you met the GRI’s standard of knowledge. If your employer has paid for you to take the course, why not take the exam to show that their money was well spent. You did more than just attend.

How will others know that you passed the exam? You can put it on your resume. Even better and more public, your name will be on the GRI website on the successful candidates page.

The exam is not free so I recommend that you study. I did, and it was worth my time.

If you decide to take the exam, good luck!

 

 

GRI Reporting for Cities

Chicago as night falls

Chicago as night falls
Photo by Michael White

Cities are getting a lot of attention for taking action on climate change. With cities having over 50 percent of the planet’s population and creating 75 percent of greenhouse gas emissions, this action is born out of necessity.

By 2050, cities will be even larger; it is estimated that they will have 70 percent of the planet’s population. With this expectation, cities are compelled to respond to increases in waste, housing demand, poverty, effluents, water demand, traffic congestion, and air pollution, just to name a few challenges. One of the ways they are responding is by sharing lessons learned with other cities. As a vehicle to share their stories, numerous cities are joining networks such as C40, ICLEI, and ANSI Network on Smart and Sustainable Cities.

In addition to joining networks, cities are preparing sustainability plans and progress reports. The plans typically state goals and targets for carbon emissions, economic initiatives, and waste management. These plans are assessed over time using periodic progress reports comparing actual results to targets. In most instances, cities use whatever reporting format they want. These reports are good for presenting what is working and what is not. Yet are unstandardized formats optimal for better management, transparency, and communication? 

I think cities  would be better served if they used the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Sustainability Reporting GuidelinesThe GRI guidelines are used by 83% of the 250 largest corporations. So what does this have to do with cities? As the most widely used framework, it is known by many investors, governments, and NGOs. This means more people would be able to understand the cities’ GRI reports.

At a recent World Bank Group Webinar, I presented how the GRI Sustainability Reporting Guidelines can benefit cities. What are the benefits? The GRI G4 guidelines focus on an organization’s economic, environmental, and social dimensions. All three are necessary to measure a city’s progress toward sustainable development. The GRI G4 guidelines enable a city to report only what is important to that city. Cities have many challenges in common, but not all challenges are equal across them. In some cities, social issues such as human rights are more pressing whereas in others environmental issues such as air quality need immediate attention. By using a well-known, standardized framework, cities and stakeholders can monitor their progress from period to period. Does using the GRI framework allow for direct comparisons across cities? I do not think any two cities are directly comparable but using a standardized framework would make it easier to share the lessons that have been learned.

Another benefit is that GRI sustainability reporting metrics provide input for an integrated report. Integrated reporting shows how organizations create value in the short, medium, and long terms. This is especially relevant for cities as they plan for the future. An integrated report is intended to connect an organization’s environmental, social, and economic concerns.  For example, if a city invests in electric buses powered with cheaper renewable energy, this investment creates value for the city in many ways. The city’s assets have increased because it purchased the buses. It now has a fleet of electric buses that will create value for the city by reducing yearly fuel and maintenance costs. Using electric buses powered by renewable energy reduces pollutants and carbon emissions which in turn improves air quality. With better air quality, the city improves the health of its citizens. As a result, health care costs are reduced. As shown by the electric bus example, an integrated report can explain how sustainability metrics are connected to creating value.

Cities need to prepare GRI reports as they plan for a sustainable future. Take a look at some pioneering cities that have adopted the GRI framework. The list includes Chicago, Atlanta, Melbourne, Dublin, and Warsaw.

Webinar – Sustainability Reporting for Cities with the World Bank Group

Join us for An Integrated  Reporting Community of Practice Event with the World Bank Group

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Sustainability and Integrated Reporting

Tuesday, November 10, 2015
9:30 am  |  Eastern Standard Time (New York, GMT-05:00)  |  1 hr
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Stranded Assets

Stranded Assets

Stranded Assets

Fossil fuel deposits are being called stranded assets. Bankers and investors consider them a high-risk source of energy. What happens when companies continue to make products that really do not have a future in a reduced fossil fuel economy? If they do not plan, companies themselves will face being stranded without viable alternatives.

Countries around the world are coming to grips with how to slow human caused climate change. Future legislation to control carbon emissions will dramatically affect fossil fuel dependent industries. This will not happen overnight, but companies need to prepare for this change.

Can sustainability reporting help? If used properly, it is a major risk management tool. It has to be more than a PR communication. If a company embeds sustainability goals into its mission and strategy, it can look at the longer-term risks facing its operations. If it is dependent on fossil fuels for raw materials or transportation, this is a major risk. Sustainability planning can assist a company as it seeks to make transitions to alternative raw materials or modes of transportation. Recognizing these risks and planning for them can help a company avoid the stranded asset problem.

For this to work, sustainability reporting needs to be transparent and integral to the operations of the business. Otherwise, this valuable tool does little to benefit the company in the long run. VW may have learned this lesson too late in the game. Their diesel engines are not performing as promised; this may well destroy the company. The strategy of making an engine with high environmental and power performance was a great one, but results were not real. Had they reported the actual performance early on, they would have been better positioned to develop alternative options. Now, they are in severe damage control mode. This will be far more costly than if they had scrapped the diesel engine that was too good to be true.

New Book Available Now!

Sustainability Reporting: Getting Started, 2015 (2nd edition). Gwendolen B. White

Sustainability Reporting: Getting Started, 2015 (2nd edition). Gwendolen B. White

My new book is now available at Business Expert Press! This latest edition presents the rationale for reporting along with a discussion of the major sustainability reporting frameworks such as the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines, the Integrated Reporting Framework, and the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board Standards. You will find detailed examples of the GRI G4 Guidelines from actual company reports such as UPS, Nestle, and Weyerhaeuser, to name a few. These examples show how major companies have applied the GRI guidelines. This book can help get your organization started on its reporting journey.