Metropolis
Cities, Cities and sustainability reporting, Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), Integrated Reporting, Integrated Reporting, Sustainability, Sustainability Reporting

GRI Standards for Cities

Metropolis
Graphic Design by Michael White

City sustainability reporting would be improved if cities used the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Sustainability Reporting Standards.

GRI Logo, 2015

The GRI framework is used by 74% of the 250 largest corporations. So what does this have to do with cities? As the most widely used framework, it is known by a variety of investors, governments, and NGOs. Many of the same investors, governments, and NGOs are scrutinizing city reports. If the city reports were prepared with a widely used standard, the reports would likely be better understood and more usable for decision making.

Cities have economic, environmental, and social impacts that should be measured in a systematic approach in order to be managed. The GRI Standards provide such an approach and encompass the triple-bottom-line by focusing on an organization’s economic, environmental, and social dimensions. All three are necessary to measure a city’s progress toward sustainable development. The GRI Standards state that organizations need to report only what is important to that city and to be transparent about its determination process.

What are some of the benefits? They are adaptable because they can be applied to any organization of any size and in any location. Cities can compare their progress from period to period. Does using the GRI framework allow for direct comparisons across cities? No two cities are directly comparable but by using the same standards sharing lessons learned would be easier. Cities can assess their economic, environmental, and social risks in addition to engaging their stakeholders about what impacts are important.

The GRI Standards provide metrics that could be used for input into an integrated report under the International Integrated Reporting Council Integrated Reporting <IR> Framework. The <IR> Framework allows organizations to demonstrate how they create value in the short, medium, and long terms. This is especially relevant for cities as they plan for the long  term. For example, if a city invests in electric buses powered with cheaper renewable energy, this investment creates value for the city in many ways. The city’s assets have increased because it purchased the buses. It now has a fleet of electric buses. Value is created each year because fuel and maintenance costs are reduced. The reduction in carbon emissions improves air quality, which results in the improved health of citizens. As a result, health care costs are reduced.

Health care cost reductions can be quantified and reported by a city. A 2014 study by a team of scientists at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), RAND Corp., and the University of Washington, reported that costs saved from reduced health impacts of GHG reduction strategies in the U.S. are estimated to be between $6 and $14 billion annually in 2020. This means the resulting GHG reductions amount to health costs benefits of between $40 and $93 per metric ton of carbon dioxide eliminated.

Take a look at cities that have adopted the GRI framework. The list includes Chicago, Atlanta, Melbourne, Dublin, and Warsaw.

 

Accountants, Accounting Education, AICPA, Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), GRI Certified Training, Integrated Reporting, ISOS Group, Sustainability, Sustainability education, Sustainability Reporting

Will Accountants Save the World?

 

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NASA/Goddard/Arizona State University

As an accountant, I was thrilled to read that Peter Bakker, President of World Business Council for Sustainable Development , said, “Accountants would save the world.” This should make any accountant smile. The realist in me knows that it will take a big “village” to save the world, but accountants can play an important role.

At an experts panel discussion in Amsterdam, Marjolein Baghuis stated, “… the conclusion was that accountants can certainly play a role in making companies more sustainable, but the profession is not quite ready to deliver on this promise without further education.” I agree!

Accountants have a long history of providing information to decision makers. They have been in the business of providing information since the 15th century. Really! If you want to read a great book, I recommend The Reckoning: Financial Accountability and the Rise and Fall of Nations by Jacob Soll.  Accountants are big players in the fortunes of companies and nations. With their experience in providing information for decision-making, accountants can provide important sustainability information to companies, governments, and the public.

Sustainability reporting is unfortunately not currently recognized as an important topic in accounting education in the United States. In a curriculum crowded with courses in tax, auditing, financial accounting, and management accounting, training in sustainability reporting is viewed as nice but not necessary.

Why is this?

There are several reasons.

  1. It is not covered on the major certification exams such as the Certified Public Accountants (CPA) exam and the Certified Management Accountant exam.
  2. There is no demand for sustainability reporting skills in accounting public practice because there is no legal requirement to do it in the United States.
  3. Inside companies, accountants are not usually tasked with sustainability accounting and reporting.
  4. Accountants in small to medium sized public practices do not traditionally offer sustainability services.
  5. Most small to medium sized accounting firms do not know how to make the business case for sustainability reporting for their own firm or for their clients.

Over the years there have been attempts to include sustainability reporting as part of accountants’ education but with little progress. Other traditional accounting topics take precedence. Without the demand, change will be slow.

Once in practice, however, accountants who desire to learn about sustainability reporting can look to several professional organizations. The American Institute of Certified Public Accountants promotes the benefits of sustainability services and provides information to its members. The International Federation of Accountants (IFAC) offers information and resources. IFAC is actively engaged with  the Prince of Wales’ Accounting for Sustainability Project, the International Integrated Reporting Council, the Climate Disclosure Standards Board, and the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI). Accountants can attend GRI certified sustainability reporting training courses offered by GRI Training Partners such as the ISOS Group.

How will demand for sustainability reporting be created? Here are some possibilities.

Mandatory reporting – Nothings creates a demand for services like a legal requirement. Examples abound – auditing, tax, Sarbanes-Oxley Act compliance.

Demand by financial institutions – As part of the evaluation of companies, lending institutions could require a sustainability report. This report would enable banks to do an expanded risk assessment. This would include a company’s environmental and social risks, which are directly tied to their economic risks.

Demand by local governments – Local governments might consider requiring sustainability reports from companies within the city limits. This would be beneficial to cities in assessing a company’s economic, environmental, and social risks. By complying, organizations would be demonstrating their good citizenship and assessing their own risks.

What do you think?

 

 

 

 

 

Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), Sustainability Reporting

Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) + Integrated Reporting Training

Indiana University Memorial Union
Indiana University Memorial Union

GRI Sustainability Reporting + Integrated Training

I will be one of the trainers at this event on the beautiful campus of Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. Please take a look at this exciting training opportunity in September.

Global Reporting Initiative (GRI)/Integrated Reporting (IR) Training  is being offered by ISOS Center for Corporate Social Responsibility in collaboration with the School of Public and Environmental Affairs (SPEA). The training session will cover the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) sustainability reporting framework and Integrated Reporting (IR) at the Indiana Memorial Union (900 East Seventh Street) from Thursday, 24 September to Saturday, 26 September. The training sessions will cover a wide variety of issues related to sustainability reporting.

Public Panel on “Who’s Responsible for Sustainability?” – Free Event!!

24 September 2015, 5:00 pm to 7:30 pm, University Club, Indiana Memorial Union
In conjunction with the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI)/Integrated Reporting (IR) Training, a panel discussion entitled “Who’s Responsible for Sustainability?” will be held at the Indiana Memorial Union’s University Club.  Indiana University has invited sustainability leaders from the public, private, and nonprofit sectors to highlight their efforts to address complex social, environmental, and economic challenges. Panelists will include:
· Bill Brown, Director of the IU Office of Sustainability;
· Jesse Kharbanda, Executive Director of the Hoosier Environmental Council;
· Karen Cecil, Director, Global Environmental Sustainability Environmental Strategy &    Compliance, Cummins Inc;
· Maria Koetter, Director of Sustainability, Louisville, KY, Metro Government

I hope to see you in Bloomington!