SDGs, Sustainability, Sustainable Development Goals

SDG Recap of all the SDGs

This post, SDG Recap, is a summary of all the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) that are in my previous posts on the SDGs.

 

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals
SDG Recap of all the goals is part of SWR’s support for the SDGs.

 

The Sustainable Development Goals contain 17 goals and 169 targets. At this point, an SDG Recap seems in order. There is a great deal to remember and consider as individuals, companies, NGOs, and governments ponder how they fit together. It is important to remember that they affect individuals that make up societies. It is easier to remember these goals if you think of how an individual can be affected.

This story is about Roberta who is concerned about being in Poverty. If she lives in poverty, then she will likely experience Hunger. Longterm periods of hunger will have an adverse effect on her Good Health and Well-being. Roberta needs her good health to pursue Quality Education. But without Gender Equality in work and education, she might remain in poverty where Clean Water and Sanitation are limited. If Roberta has access to education, she needs Affordable and Renewable Energy to be able to cook her food and complete her school work.

Once she has completed her education, she will have more opportunities to obtain Decent Work and contribute to Economic Growth. With equal access to quality education, Roberta could become an engineer who works in Industry, contributes to Innovation, and builds Infrastructure. As part of a diverse workforce, she can participate in a society that has Reduced Inequalities.

Roberta will want to live in Sustainable Cities and Communities that reinforce a high quality of life where people engage in Responsible Consumption and Production. Sustainable cities take Climate Action seriously by protecting Life Below Water and Life on Land. Roberta’s personal goals to have a good life are supported in places, institutions and companies that promote Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions and where Partnerships for the Sustainable Development Goals are plentiful.

The Sustainable Development Goals provide governments, NGOs, companies, and individuals with the opportunity to work toward a better world for all. In my previous posts, I gave numerous examples of how companies are already supporting the SDGs. They have found many opportunities to do good things for the world and prosper at the same time.

 

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SDGs, Sustainability, Sustainability Reporting, Sustainable Development Goals

SDG 17 Partnerships for the Goals

SDG 17 Partnerships for the Goals is part of my series on the SDGs.

United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 17
SWR supports the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

Finance

  • Strengthen domestic resource mobilization, including through international support to developing countries, to improve domestic capacity for tax and other revenue collection
  • Developed countries to implement fully their official development assistance commitments, including the commitment by many developed countries to achieve the target of 0.7 per cent of ODA/GNI to developing countries and 0.15 to 0.20 per cent of ODA/GNI to least developed countries ODA providers are encouraged to consider setting a target to provide at least 0.20 per cent of ODA/GNI to least developed countries
  • Mobilize additional financial resources for developing countries from multiple sources
  • Assist developing countries in attaining long-term debt sustainability through coordinated policies aimed at fostering debt financing, debt relief and debt restructuring, as appropriate, and address the external debt of highly indebted poor countries to reduce debt distress
  • Adopt and implement investment promotion regimes for least developed countries

Technology

  • Enhance North-South, South-South and triangular regional and international cooperation on and access to science, technology and innovation and enhance knowledge sharing on mutually agreed terms, including through improved coordination among existing mechanisms, in particular at the United Nations level, and through a global technology facilitation mechanism
  • Promote the development, transfer, dissemination and diffusion of environmentally sound technologies to developing countries on favourable terms, including on concessional and preferential terms, as mutually agreed
  • Fully operationalize the technology bank and science, technology and innovation capacity-building mechanism for least developed countries by 2017 and enhance the use of enabling technology, in particular information and communications technology

Capacity building

  • Enhance international support for implementing effective and targeted capacity-building in developing countries to support national plans to implement all the sustainable development goals, including through North-South, South-South and triangular cooperation

Trade

  • Promote a universal, rules-based, open, non-discriminatory and equitable multilateral trading system under the World Trade Organization, including through the conclusion of negotiations under its Doha Development Agenda
  • Significantly increase the exports of developing countries, in particular with a view to doubling the least developed countries’ share of global exports by 2020
  • Realize timely implementation of duty-free and quota-free market access on a lasting basis for all least developed countries, consistent with World Trade Organization decisions, including by ensuring that preferential rules of origin applicable to imports from least developed countries are transparent and simple, and contribute to facilitating market access

Systemic issues

Policy and institutional coherence

  • Enhance global macroeconomic stability, including through policy coordination and policy coherence

Enhance policy coherence for sustainable development

  • Respect each country’s policy space and leadership to establish and implement policies for poverty eradication and sustainable development

Multi-stakeholder partnerships

  • Enhance the global partnership for sustainable development, complemented by multi-stakeholder partnerships that mobilize and share knowledge, expertise, technology and financial resources, to support the achievement of the sustainable development goals in all countries, in particular developing countries
  • Encourage and promote effective public, public-private and civil society partnerships, building on the experience and resourcing strategies of partnerships

Data, monitoring and accountability

  • By 2020, enhance capacity-building support to developing countries, including for least developed countries and small island developing States, to increase significantly the availability of high-quality, timely and reliable data disaggregated by income, gender, age, race, ethnicity, migratory status, disability, geographic location and other characteristics relevant in national contexts
  • By 2030, build on existing initiatives to develop measurements of progress on sustainable development that complement gross domestic product, and support statistical capacity-building in developing countries

 

ANZ supports SDG 17 Partnerships for the Goals by describing their employee volunteering participation.

 

Ericsson provides support for SDG 17 in several ways. One was the launch of a report discussing how business can play a role in achieving the SDGs.

 

Another example for Ericsson is how the company is involved in humanitarian responses during major disasters.

 

We have come to the end of the 17 SDGs. My next post will be a recap of all 17.

 

 

SDGs, Sustainability

SDG Goal 2 No Hunger

United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 02
SWR supports the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture

2.1 By 2030, end hunger and ensure access by all people, in particular the poor and people in vulnerable situations, including infants, to safe, nutritious and sufficient food all year round

2.2 By 2030, end all forms of malnutrition, including achieving, by 2025, the internationally agreed targets on stunting and wasting in children under 5 years of age, and address the nutritional needs of adolescent girls, pregnant and lactating women and older persons

2.3 By 2030, double the agricultural productivity and incomes of small-scale food producers, in particular women, indigenous peoples, family farmers, pastoralists and fishers, including through secure and equal access to land, other productive resources and inputs, knowledge, financial services, markets and opportunities for value addition and non-farm employment

2.4 By 2030, ensure sustainable food production systems and implement resilient agricultural practices that increase productivity and production, that help maintain ecosystems, that strengthen capacity for adaptation to climate change, extreme weather, drought, flooding and other disasters and that progressively improve land and soil quality

2.5 By 2020, maintain the genetic diversity of seeds, cultivated plants and farmed and domesticated animals and their related wild species, including through soundly managed and diversified seed and plant banks at the national, regional and international levels, and promote access to and fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from the utilization of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge, as internationally agreed

2.a Increase investment, including through enhanced international cooperation, in rural infrastructure, agricultural research and extension services, technology development and plant and livestock gene banks in order to enhance agricultural productive capacity in developing countries, in particular least developed countries

2.b Correct and prevent trade restrictions and distortions in world agricultural markets, including through the parallel elimination of all forms of agricultural export subsidies and all export measures with equivalent effect, in accordance with the mandate of the Doha Development Round

2.c Adopt measures to ensure the proper functioning of food commodity markets and their derivatives and facilitate timely access to market information, including on food reserves, in order to help limit extreme food price volatility

Individual companies cannot solve world hunger alone, but the examples provided below illustrate how two companies are contributing to achieving SDG Goal 2. Every organization should examine their operational mission and strategy to find ways to contribute to achieving SDG Goals.

Unilever addresses Goal 2 End Hunger in its 2015 Strategic Report.

“Our ambition is for sustainable approaches to agriculture to become mainstream and to improve the livelihoods of smallholder farmers. This supports SDG 2 ‘End Hunger’.

Smallholder farmers and family farms produce 70% of the world’s food. Working with these producers is critical for Unilever as we strive to reach our sustainable sourcing targets and improve the livelihoods of those in our supply chain and surrounding communities. Working in global partnerships, we have identified a number of crops and countries that require targeted, integrated action to improve sustainable agricultural practices, link smallholders to our markets, address food nutrition gaps, improve business skills and provide finance.

In support of this approach, we formed a number of new partnerships. In 2015, Unilever, Acumen and the Clinton Giustra Enterprise Partnership (CGEP) launched the Enhanced Livelihoods Investment Initiative to improve the livelihoods of as many as 300,000 smallholder communities across Africa, South Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean. It is a three-year US$10 million investment plan to spur economic growth by backing private enterprises, which link smallholders to Unilever’s global supply chain and distribution networks.

In 2015, Unilever and the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN) created a Nutrition Intervention Program, which aims to improve the health and nutrition of 2.5 million rural people. Its aim is to reach smallholder farmers, from helping them to diversify their diets to providing better information on nutrition.

Addressing hunger is also about reducing food waste. A third of food calories produced are never eaten. To combat this, Unilever helped shape the Consumer Goods Forum pledge, working alongside the World Resources Institute, to halve food waste by 2025 within member company operations, and reduce food waste among consumers and through the supply chain. To help achieve this, we have a new partnership with the Global Foodbank Network allowing us to redirect food that is still fit to be consumed. Also, Unilever is supporting the ‘Champions 12.3’ coalition that seeks to tackle food loss and waste. Our CEO, Paul Polman, is a champion along with other business leaders and representatives from civil society and government.”

Ball Corporation reported in its 2016 Sustainability Report, its approaches to the SDG Goals in the following way.

“Since 2015, Ball Corporation has partnered with IMPACT 2030, a business-led effort with the goal to enhance the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) through corporate employee volunteerism. Three of the 17 SDGs (zero hunger, quality education, responsible consumption and production) are directly tied to Ball’s key focus areas and Ball employee volunteering programs.”

Goal 2 is addressed by Ball Corporation as follows.

“Food security is a key focus area for Ball’s community engagement efforts because it is closely tied to our North American food can business. In 2014, one in seven Americans lived in food-insecure households, including 32.8 million adults and 15.3 million children. Because the nutritional value is sealed inside, canned food provides safe, nutritious meals to those who need it. Canned foods also help minimize food waste and are easy to prepare.

Ball and its employees are committed to helping ensure that everyone in their communities has access to nutritious food. In 2015, Ball’s annual “Let’s Can Hunger” food drive expanded across all North American locations. Events in the U.S., Canada and Mexico were held to unite employees and collect donations. In two weeks, employees donated more than 170,000 pounds of canned food and raised more than $215,000 in monetary contributions, which provided approximately 700,000 meals to individuals in 37 communities where Ball operates.

The food collected, combined with employee donations and the money unlocked through Ball’s matching gifts program, helped nonprofit organizations provide and improve local access to sufficient food resources for individuals and families in need. During the reporting period, Ball employees also volunteered more than 1,200 hours alone in food- and nutrition-related causes serving nonprofit organizations.”

My next blog post will discuss SDG Goal 3 Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages.