GRI G4 Exam
Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), GRI Certified Training, GRI Standards Exam, Sustainability

GRI Standards Exam – Things to consider

GRI G4 Exam
GRI Standards Exam

Last week I received an email inquiring about my experience with the GRI Standards Exam. This reminded me that several years have passed since I wrote about my experience with the GRI G4 Exam.

Definitely time for an update!

Things to consider about the GRI Standards Exam

Although completing the GRI Certified Standards Course is not a prerequisite, GRI recommends that exam candidates take the course. I agree because I have experience taking the GRI Standards Exam and am a trainer with the ISOSGroup that delivers GRI’s Certified Training. I know how the course can help you to understand the standards and to apply them. If you have taken the course, GRI gives a 20% discount off the exam fee.

After completing the course, you should study for the exam by reading the standards carefully and taking notes. Understanding how to apply the standards is important. I studied, and it paid off.

Once you register for the exam, you will be given access to sample questions. This helps to understand the format and type of questions to expect.

GRI’s Online Learning Platform administers the exam. This allows the convenience of taking the exam from any location with Internet access. You need a webcam and microphone because you will be recorded while taking the exam. If you have not used a similar test platform, you definitely will want to understand the setup details before hand. This involves making sure that your equipment is compatible with the platform and you are comfortable with the instructions.

You have 60 minutes to answer 40 questions. During the exam you have access to a non-searchable pdf of the consolidated set of standards. Don’t waste much time scrolling through the pdf document looking for answers. As with any timed exam, you need to pace yourself.

Once you pass the exam, your name will be listed with the other successful exam candidates’ names on the GRI website.

Good luck!!

 

 

 

 

ESG, ESG Disclosure Simplification Act 2019, ESG Disclosures, Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), Sustainability, Sustainability Reporting

ESG Disclosures – U.S. House Committee

To help strengthen environmental, social and governance (ESG) disclosures legislation, the Subcommittee on Investor Protection, Entrepreneurship and Capital Markets in Washington, DC heard testimony from ESG experts. Their testimony will go toward the development of The ESG Disclosure Simplification Act 2019.

Why is this so important? ESG disclosures help internal and external decision makers assess risks and opportunities. This hearing is important because it spotlights how important these disclosures are to investors.

The U.S. House Financial Services Committee heard testimony of experts from the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), CalPERS, Ceres, Decatur Capital Management, an investment management firm, and Patomak Global Partners.

The written testimony of each witness can be accessed at the following links:

To view the hearing, click this link. Testimony starts at 20 minutes.

Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), GRI Certified Training, ISOS Group, SDGs, Sustainability, Sustainability Reporting, Sustainable Development Goals

ISOSGroup GRI Standards Training in Seattle and Chicago

This past month I have been busy delivering ISOSGroup GRI Standards Training in Seattle and Chicago.

Linda Glasier, an excellent trainer, and I delivered a course on GRI Standards at the Recology Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) in Seattle. The participants represented companies in the recycling, mining, cruise ship, oil extraction, and public transit sectors. Their engagement in the training and discussion from their diverse experiences resulted in rewarding sessions for all. You may recall from a prior post, I wrote about being hosted by Recology at their headquarters in San Francisco.

At the Recology MRF, we toured the Seattle facility where paper, plastic, and metals are separated to be recycled. The facility is quite impressive.

Recology
Recology MRF

 

Recology MRF
Recology MRF Sorting Process

In Chicago, Burson Marsteller hosted the GRI Standards training at their office in the Merchandise Mart. At this session, participants represented consulting, nonprofit, mining, and technology organizations. Because of their engagement and great questions, we had thorough discussions about the application the GRI Standards! As you can see from the picture below, we had a great view.

Chicago
View of Chicago street from Merchandise Mart

 

I enjoy all these trainings and hope that you can join in future events. If you need to learn about GRI Standards, CDP, or SDGs, the ISOSGroup offers courses in San Diego December 3-7, 2018. Take a look at the schedule to see what fits your needs.

 

 

CDP, Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), SDGs, Sustainability, Sustainability Reporting

Sustainability Training in San Francisco

Last week I was working with the ISOSGroup delivering sustainability training in San Francisco. During this 3 day session, we covered the GRI Standards, the CDP Climate Change Program, and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). It was a great training hosted by Recology at their corporate headquarters. The group that we trained was as amazing as the view. There were people from Recology and other companies along with students from the Presidio Graduate School.

San Francisco
View of San Francisco Bay

These trainings are meeting the increased demand for information about organizations’ economic, environmental, and social risks. The GRI Standards provides organizations with the tool to better manage these risks. Do you have an interest in learning more about the GRI Standards? You are in luck because ISOSGroup has two scheduled trainings in October. I will be training in Seattle and Chicago for the next two events.

Hope to see you there!

 

CDP, Cities, Cities and sustainability reporting, Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), ISO 37120, Sustainability

Resilient Cities Conference 2018 #2

It was my pleasure to make this presentation on how the City of Bloomington, Indiana tracks its progress on resilience and sustainability during the session entitled Measuring urban resilience and evaluating impacts at the Resilient Cities Conference 2018.

Measuring urban resilience and evaluating impacts

I represented the City of Bloomington at the Resilient Cities Conference 2018 in Bonn, Germany in my role as Chair of the City of Bloomington Commission on Sustainability.  The commission has as part of its mission to measure, monitor, and report on the community’s progress toward sustainability.

See my slide presentation and comments below.

 

This slide represents a list of reporting frameworks that all cities could use to report on their sustainability progress.

The city prepared its first Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Sustainability Report in 2012. You can access Bloomington’s full GRI report here.

Bloomington was involved in the STAR Community Index Leading Indicators Program.

You can read about how Bloomington reduced its GHG emissions in its latest GHG inventory here.

As the City of Bloomington considers its long range plan for land use and development, it completed its 2018 Comprehensive Plan. The plan is a set of goals, policies, maps, illustrations, and implementation strategies that state how the City of Bloomington should address development: physically, socially, and economically.

The city is engaged currently in preparing a Sustainability Action Plan, which will address transportation, energy, food, and the built environment.

In an earlier blog post, I discussed how ISO 37120 Sustainable development of communities — Indicators for city services and quality of life would be useful to a city.

As we look at our next steps in reporting, there are numerous things to do to monitor the city’s progress. The metrics set out in the Comprehensive Plan and the Sustainability Action Plan will provide information about how well the city is adhering to its plans. In addition, other standardized reporting frameworks can be used to monitor Bloomington’s progress in its sustainable development.

To help understand all of our metrics, I recommend that a summary of all the reports be prepared to get a picture of what the city is doing. A summary report should be written each year to determine our strengths, weaknesses, and progress. This report could be presented to the City Council and Mayor as part of a formal annual reporting by the Commission on Sustainability.